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Recognize the Signs of Opiate Addiction

Addiction is commonly described as an inability to stop using a substance even when it’s having a a negative impact on health, relationships, finances, or any other aspect of a person’s life.

 

If you suspect that you or someone you love is battling addiction, help them help themselves by talking to them and arranging for treatment.

You may have an opportunity to intervene before a growing drug habit turns into a full-fledged addiction.

 

Learn to recognize the commons signs and symptoms of opiate abuse, and you’ll stand a much better chance at helping your loved one.

 

Physical Signs

Opiate drugs are depressant in nature and will generally make a person appear tired or sluggish with an accompanying appearance of euphoria. The user may seem confused or without direction. Opiates typically cause constricted pupils, slower breathing and heart rates, and constipation.

 

Behavioral Signs

An opioid abuser may make trips to several doctors in an effort to obtain multiple prescriptions, and you may notice additional pill bottles around the house or in the trash. Opiate use can cause mood swings and unpredictable behavior, which may cause or coincide with social withdrawal and isolation.

 

One of the most prevalent signs of a drug problem is sudden financial issues—this symptom is common to any

addiction.

 

Withdrawal Signs

The toll of withdrawal on the human body can be immense, and its effect is nowhere more noticeable than in the case of opioid addiction. A chronic user who goes without opiates will exhibit symptoms of withdrawal in as soon as one day. These include anxiety, fatigue, diarrhea, sweating, nausea and vomiting, and sleeplessness. Overall withdrawal cases present much like a severe case of the flu.

 

Don’t wait to check multiple items from this post off your list before talking to someone you suspect has a drug problem. Early intervention is key to helping that person recover from addiction and return to a healthy, productive life.

 

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